0

It’s time to update your Twitter and GitHub passwords. Both services have confirmed that usernames and passwords were saved unmasked in plain text in internal logs. This is not a security breach, but users are advised to create a new password as a precautionary measure.

When you create an account for an online service, your login credentials should be masked using a process called hashing so that no one — not even employees at that service — can see your password. This ensures that your account is safe, even if internal systems are breached and the data makes its way into the wrong hands. But Twitter and GitHub have slipped up by inadvertently storing passwords in plain text.



Twitter Support posted a tweet suggesting that subscribers "consider changing your password on all services where you’ve used this password." Also, Twitter executives Jack Dorsey (COO) and Parag Agrawal (CTO) each sent out their own tweets about the bug. The former wrote, "We’ve fixed, see no indication of breach or misuse, and believe it’s important for us to be open about this internal defect." While Agrawal tweeted, "We are sharing this information to help people make an informed decision about their account security."

Twitter did not disclose the number of passwords that was discovered on the internal log. But as a precaution, it's asking all subscribers to have a new password. It is also advisable to change those on any other service if it's the same with the one you use on Twitter.

How to Change Your Twitter Password

Go to your Twitter account settings page.Click on accountClick password and enter your current password, then type in a new one.

Post a Comment

Dear readers, after reading the Content provide constructive feedback Please Write Relevant Comment with Polite Language.Your opinion is much more valuable to me. Thank you.

Friday, 4 May 2018

Twitter asks users to change password see reasons


It’s time to update your Twitter and GitHub passwords. Both services have confirmed that usernames and passwords were saved unmasked in plain text in internal logs. This is not a security breach, but users are advised to create a new password as a precautionary measure.

When you create an account for an online service, your login credentials should be masked using a process called hashing so that no one — not even employees at that service — can see your password. This ensures that your account is safe, even if internal systems are breached and the data makes its way into the wrong hands. But Twitter and GitHub have slipped up by inadvertently storing passwords in plain text.



Twitter Support posted a tweet suggesting that subscribers "consider changing your password on all services where you’ve used this password." Also, Twitter executives Jack Dorsey (COO) and Parag Agrawal (CTO) each sent out their own tweets about the bug. The former wrote, "We’ve fixed, see no indication of breach or misuse, and believe it’s important for us to be open about this internal defect." While Agrawal tweeted, "We are sharing this information to help people make an informed decision about their account security."

Twitter did not disclose the number of passwords that was discovered on the internal log. But as a precaution, it's asking all subscribers to have a new password. It is also advisable to change those on any other service if it's the same with the one you use on Twitter.

How to Change Your Twitter Password

Go to your Twitter account settings page.Click on accountClick password and enter your current password, then type in a new one.


It’s time to update your Twitter and GitHub passwords. Both services have confirmed that usernames and passwords were saved unmasked in plain text in internal logs. This is not a security breach, but users are advised to create a new password as a precautionary measure.

When you create an account for an online service, your login credentials should be masked using a process called hashing so that no one — not even employees at that service — can see your password. This ensures that your account is safe, even if internal systems are breached and the data makes its way into the wrong hands. But Twitter and GitHub have slipped up by inadvertently storing passwords in plain text.



Twitter Support posted a tweet suggesting that subscribers "consider changing your password on all services where you’ve used this password." Also, Twitter executives Jack Dorsey (COO) and Parag Agrawal (CTO) each sent out their own tweets about the bug. The former wrote, "We’ve fixed, see no indication of breach or misuse, and believe it’s important for us to be open about this internal defect." While Agrawal tweeted, "We are sharing this information to help people make an informed decision about their account security."

Twitter did not disclose the number of passwords that was discovered on the internal log. But as a precaution, it's asking all subscribers to have a new password. It is also advisable to change those on any other service if it's the same with the one you use on Twitter.

How to Change Your Twitter Password

Go to your Twitter account settings page.Click on accountClick password and enter your current password, then type in a new one.


It’s time to update your Twitter and GitHub passwords. Both services have confirmed that usernames and passwords were saved unmasked in plain text in internal logs. This is not a security breach, but users are advised to create a new password as a precautionary measure.


When you create an account for an online service, your login credentials should be masked using a process called hashing so that no one — not even employees at that service — can see your password. This ensures that your account is safe, even if internal systems are breached and the data makes its way into the wrong hands. But Twitter and GitHub have slipped up by inadvertently storing passwords in plain text.



Twitter Support posted a tweet suggesting that subscribers "consider changing your password on all services where you’ve used this password." Also, Twitter executives Jack Dorsey (COO) and Parag Agrawal (CTO) each sent out their own tweets about the bug. The former wrote, "We’ve fixed, see no indication of breach or misuse, and believe it’s important for us to be open about this internal defect." While Agrawal tweeted, "We are sharing this information to help people make an informed decision about their account security."

Twitter did not disclose the number of passwords that was discovered on the internal log. But as a precaution, it's asking all subscribers to have a new password. It is also advisable to change those on any other service if it's the same with the one you use on Twitter.

How to Change Your Twitter Password

Go to your Twitter account settings page.Click on accountClick password and enter your current password, then type in a new one.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Commenting & Sharing is caring!
If you don't have a Google account, kindly comment using "ANONYMOUS"