0
Whether on desktop or mobile, Chrome always offers to save your logins and passwords so it can easily autofill your details the next time you need to log in. In a way, if you accept that pop-up, Chrome (and thus Google) become your password manager.

However, what happens if you want to use another password manager app? Migration can be a bit tough and not-so-straightforward and that's why Chrome is now offering an export function.

The option has been in the works in the Chromium gerrit, and is now available in Chrome Dev on the desktop (which probably means ChromeOS and the regular browser). When you go to your Manage passwords section in settings, you should see a new overflow menu next to Saved Passwords. Tapping it unveils the option to export passwords as a .csv file. Many third-party password managers support importing login details as a .csv so this should make data migration a very easy thing and get you going with your new password manager in no time.

As it turns out, this option is available also in Chrome stable (and most probably beta) under the flag Passport export. Copy and paste chrome://flags/#password-export in your browser and enable it. I tested it out and it turned on the overflow menu, gave me the option to export my passwords, and generated a proper .csv file for me. The only verification required was to enter my Windows password, not my Google one - huh.

Post a Comment

Dear readers, after reading the Content provide constructive feedback Please Write Relevant Comment with Polite Language.Your opinion is much more valuable to me. Thank you.

Tuesday, 13 March 2018

Chrome lets you export your saved logins as .csv to easily import into your favorite password manager

Whether on desktop or mobile, Chrome always offers to save your logins and passwords so it can easily autofill your details the next time you need to log in. In a way, if you accept that pop-up, Chrome (and thus Google) become your password manager.

However, what happens if you want to use another password manager app? Migration can be a bit tough and not-so-straightforward and that's why Chrome is now offering an export function.

The option has been in the works in the Chromium gerrit, and is now available in Chrome Dev on the desktop (which probably means ChromeOS and the regular browser). When you go to your Manage passwords section in settings, you should see a new overflow menu next to Saved Passwords. Tapping it unveils the option to export passwords as a .csv file. Many third-party password managers support importing login details as a .csv so this should make data migration a very easy thing and get you going with your new password manager in no time.

As it turns out, this option is available also in Chrome stable (and most probably beta) under the flag Passport export. Copy and paste chrome://flags/#password-export in your browser and enable it. I tested it out and it turned on the overflow menu, gave me the option to export my passwords, and generated a proper .csv file for me. The only verification required was to enter my Windows password, not my Google one - huh.
Whether on desktop or mobile, Chrome always offers to save your logins and passwords so it can easily autofill your details the next time you need to log in. In a way, if you accept that pop-up, Chrome (and thus Google) become your password manager.

However, what happens if you want to use another password manager app? Migration can be a bit tough and not-so-straightforward and that's why Chrome is now offering an export function.

The option has been in the works in the Chromium gerrit, and is now available in Chrome Dev on the desktop (which probably means ChromeOS and the regular browser). When you go to your Manage passwords section in settings, you should see a new overflow menu next to Saved Passwords. Tapping it unveils the option to export passwords as a .csv file. Many third-party password managers support importing login details as a .csv so this should make data migration a very easy thing and get you going with your new password manager in no time.

As it turns out, this option is available also in Chrome stable (and most probably beta) under the flag Passport export. Copy and paste chrome://flags/#password-export in your browser and enable it. I tested it out and it turned on the overflow menu, gave me the option to export my passwords, and generated a proper .csv file for me. The only verification required was to enter my Windows password, not my Google one - huh.

Whether on desktop or mobile, Chrome always offers to save your logins and passwords so it can easily autofill your details the next time you need to log in. In a way, if you accept that pop-up, Chrome (and thus Google) become your password manager.


However, what happens if you want to use another password manager app? Migration can be a bit tough and not-so-straightforward and that's why Chrome is now offering an export function.

The option has been in the works in the Chromium gerrit, and is now available in Chrome Dev on the desktop (which probably means ChromeOS and the regular browser). When you go to your Manage passwords section in settings, you should see a new overflow menu next to Saved Passwords. Tapping it unveils the option to export passwords as a .csv file. Many third-party password managers support importing login details as a .csv so this should make data migration a very easy thing and get you going with your new password manager in no time.

As it turns out, this option is available also in Chrome stable (and most probably beta) under the flag Passport export. Copy and paste chrome://flags/#password-export in your browser and enable it. I tested it out and it turned on the overflow menu, gave me the option to export my passwords, and generated a proper .csv file for me. The only verification required was to enter my Windows password, not my Google one - huh.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Commenting & Sharing is caring!
If you don't have a Google account, kindly comment using "ANONYMOUS"