0
Facebook Stories are getting vifeo ads Facebook Stories are getting vifeo ads

Posting social media updates is so  yesterday . Stories are all the rage now with big players like Snapchat and Instagram racking up many m...

0
Chainfire, creator of SuperSU, announces end of development for his root apps Chainfire, creator of SuperSU, announces end of development for his root apps

Chainfire is best known for creating  SuperSU , one of the most popular superuser managers on Android, but he has also developed countl...

0
There's a black โšซ emoji message that crashes any Android app, but it's no big deal There's a black ⚫ emoji message that crashes any Android app, but it's no big deal

There's a message that's making the rounds on WhatsApp that mysteriously causes the app to crash if you dare to tap on the black...

0
Twitter asks users to change password see reasons Twitter asks users to change password see reasons

It’s time to update your Twitter and GitHub passwords. Both services have confirmed that usernames and passwords were saved unmasked in pla...

0
Instagram announces video chat feature, Instagram announces video chat feature,

Instagram recently announced that it would release an Instagram video chat feature.Instagram video chat will allow one-on-one conversati...

Wednesday, 23 May 2018

Facebook Stories are getting vifeo ads

Posting social media updates is so yesterday. Stories are all the rage now with big players like Snapchat and Instagram racking up many millions of Stories each day. Now, Facebook's version of stories has hit a big user milestone—150 million daily users. Being Facebook, that means it's time to start pushing ads.

In case you're unaware, Facebook Stories are similar to stories on every other platform. They're short video and photo montages put together by users. You can only view them twice, and they vanish in 24 hours. Facebook's 150 million daily user count is still short of the estimated 300 million using Instagram Stories (which Facebook owns), but that's 150 million sets of eyeballs that could be looking at ads. So, here they come.

The ads are rolling out starting today in the US, Mexico, and Brazil. The ads consist of 5 to 15-second videos, but there's no click-through functionality for now—they're just videos, and you can skip them. That could change later, and this is just a test. The functionality of Facebook Story ads might be very different when they roll out to everyone.
Posting social media updates is so yesterday. Stories are all the rage now with big players like Snapchat and Instagram racking up many millions of Stories each day. Now, Facebook's version of stories has hit a big user milestone—150 million daily users. Being Facebook, that means it's time to start pushing ads.

In case you're unaware, Facebook Stories are similar to stories on every other platform. They're short video and photo montages put together by users. You can only view them twice, and they vanish in 24 hours. Facebook's 150 million daily user count is still short of the estimated 300 million using Instagram Stories (which Facebook owns), but that's 150 million sets of eyeballs that could be looking at ads. So, here they come.

The ads are rolling out starting today in the US, Mexico, and Brazil. The ads consist of 5 to 15-second videos, but there's no click-through functionality for now—they're just videos, and you can skip them. That could change later, and this is just a test. The functionality of Facebook Story ads might be very different when they roll out to everyone.

Posting social media updates is so yesterday. Stories are all the rage now with big players like Snapchat and Instagram racking up many millions of Stories each day. Now, Facebook's version of stories has hit a big user milestone—150 million daily users. Being Facebook, that means it's time to start pushing ads.

In case you're unaware, Facebook Stories are similar to stories on every other platform. They're short video and photo montages put together by users. You can only view them twice, and they vanish in 24 hours. Facebook's 150 million daily user count is still short of the estimated 300 million using Instagram Stories (which Facebook owns), but that's 150 million sets of eyeballs that could be looking at ads. So, here they come.

The ads are rolling out starting today in the US, Mexico, and Brazil. The ads consist of 5 to 15-second videos, but there's no click-through functionality for now—they're just videos, and you can skip them. That could change later, and this is just a test. The functionality of Facebook Story ads might be very different when they roll out to everyone.

Sunday, 6 May 2018

Chainfire, creator of SuperSU, announces end of development for his root apps





Chainfire is best known for creating SuperSU, one of the most popular superuser managers on Android, but he has also developed countless other applications. Some examples include FlashFireSideload Launcher for Android TVstickMount, andCF.lumen. He transferred SuperSU to a new development team back in 2015, and his involvement in the app ended last year.




Today, Chainfire announced on his Google+ account that all his root-related apps will no longer be maintained or updated. SuperSU will continue to be developed, because it is maintained by another team. He hopes to update a few non-root applications in the future, but some will be shelved as well.
Here's the final part of his announcement:
Again I would like to thank everyone who has supported me and my developments over the years! I've met great people and made good friends, some of which I'm now actively working with on other projects, even.
But at the moment I'm not using root on my main Android devices for anything other than development, which turns it into a circular reference for me. As for regular Android, I have not been particularly enamoured with the direction it has been going in either.
But just because I'm not enthusiastic about working on these things now doesn't mean a new idea or project can't come along to change that at any time.
You can read Chainfire's full post at the source link below.








Chainfire is best known for creating SuperSU, one of the most popular superuser managers on Android, but he has also developed countless other applications. Some examples include FlashFireSideload Launcher for Android TVstickMount, andCF.lumen. He transferred SuperSU to a new development team back in 2015, and his involvement in the app ended last year.




Today, Chainfire announced on his Google+ account that all his root-related apps will no longer be maintained or updated. SuperSU will continue to be developed, because it is maintained by another team. He hopes to update a few non-root applications in the future, but some will be shelved as well.
Here's the final part of his announcement:
Again I would like to thank everyone who has supported me and my developments over the years! I've met great people and made good friends, some of which I'm now actively working with on other projects, even.
But at the moment I'm not using root on my main Android devices for anything other than development, which turns it into a circular reference for me. As for regular Android, I have not been particularly enamoured with the direction it has been going in either.
But just because I'm not enthusiastic about working on these things now doesn't mean a new idea or project can't come along to change that at any time.
You can read Chainfire's full post at the source link below.








Chainfire is best known for creating SuperSU, one of the most popular superuser managers on Android, but he has also developed countless other applications. Some examples include FlashFireSideload Launcher for Android TVstickMount, andCF.lumen. He transferred SuperSU to a new development team back in 2015, and his involvement in the app ended last year.




Today, Chainfire announced on his Google+ account that all his root-related apps will no longer be maintained or updated. SuperSU will continue to be developed, because it is maintained by another team. He hopes to update a few non-root applications in the future, but some will be shelved as well.
Here's the final part of his announcement:
Again I would like to thank everyone who has supported me and my developments over the years! I've met great people and made good friends, some of which I'm now actively working with on other projects, even.
But at the moment I'm not using root on my main Android devices for anything other than development, which turns it into a circular reference for me. As for regular Android, I have not been particularly enamoured with the direction it has been going in either.
But just because I'm not enthusiastic about working on these things now doesn't mean a new idea or project can't come along to change that at any time.
You can read Chainfire's full post at the source link below.




There's a black ⚫ emoji message that crashes any Android app, but it's no big deal





There's a message that's making the rounds on WhatsApp that mysteriously causes the app to crash if you dare to tap on the black dot within. You may have already come across it and wondered how just tapping on a single emoji can cause an app to freeze and become unresponsive. The answer, unsurprisingly, is that it can't.

The message, which is shown below, is actually made up of more than what meets the eye. You might have even suspected as much if you already noticed that tapping anywhere on the message — and not only on the black dot — triggers the bug. The fact is that there are hundreds (around two thousand, actually) of invisible characters in the message that end up causing Android's text rendering engine to go haywire and ultimately crash, particularly on older devices. (Some newer phones like the Pixel 2 seem to recover after freezing up and don't force close the app.)





<⚫๐Ÿ‘ˆ๐Ÿป ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎from Novelvibes.com.ng you‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏can't touch this
Since Chrome seems to behave differently when you tap text, this *probably* won't crash your browser, but copying the text into some other app likely will

The message with the invisible characters made visible. Source: Tom Scott




Tom Scott, a relatively popular YouTuber who covers multiple topics ranging from science to computers, posted a brief explanation of how the message bug works. The gist of it is that the invisible part of the message is comprised of special characters which Unicode uses to specify whether a given text should be laid out right-to-left or left-to-right. These characters are necessary to properly display text in several languages that are written right-to-left, such as Hebrew and Arabic.
There's nothing wrong with these characters per se. Modern devices have been able to handle LTR and RTL text for decades, even within the same sentence. The issue only shows up when a strange combination of characters triggers some obscure bug in the rendering engine — which is precisely what is happening here. The sequence of two thousand characters switches the text's orientation back and forth repeatedly, and when the engine can't handle this string of characters, it locks up and crashes the app. The curious part is that Android is able to display the characters without any issue, but locks up when a user tries to tap the message.
As you may have guessed, there's nothing particularly special about WhatsApp: the bug is related to Android's text rendering engine, so almost any app that displays text is susceptible to it (Chrome seems to be immune to the bug, however). Fortunately, the bug is also mostly harmless. It won't cause any data loss, it won't force your device to reboot, and it won't prevent you from closing the app and opening it again. As far as text rendering bugs go, that's pretty tame, and the same can't be said for other bugs that have come up over the years. This isn't the first bug of its kind we've come across, and it certainly won't be the last.




It's also clear that there's nothing at all special about the black dot emoji, since it's not the emoji itself that's causing the crash. Any other emoji works just as well, though a black dot has an arguably more ominous vibe to it. 




There's a message that's making the rounds on WhatsApp that mysteriously causes the app to crash if you dare to tap on the black dot within. You may have already come across it and wondered how just tapping on a single emoji can cause an app to freeze and become unresponsive. The answer, unsurprisingly, is that it can't.

The message, which is shown below, is actually made up of more than what meets the eye. You might have even suspected as much if you already noticed that tapping anywhere on the message — and not only on the black dot — triggers the bug. The fact is that there are hundreds (around two thousand, actually) of invisible characters in the message that end up causing Android's text rendering engine to go haywire and ultimately crash, particularly on older devices. (Some newer phones like the Pixel 2 seem to recover after freezing up and don't force close the app.)





<⚫๐Ÿ‘ˆ๐Ÿป ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎from Novelvibes.com.ng you‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏can't touch this
Since Chrome seems to behave differently when you tap text, this *probably* won't crash your browser, but copying the text into some other app likely will

The message with the invisible characters made visible. Source: Tom Scott




Tom Scott, a relatively popular YouTuber who covers multiple topics ranging from science to computers, posted a brief explanation of how the message bug works. The gist of it is that the invisible part of the message is comprised of special characters which Unicode uses to specify whether a given text should be laid out right-to-left or left-to-right. These characters are necessary to properly display text in several languages that are written right-to-left, such as Hebrew and Arabic.
There's nothing wrong with these characters per se. Modern devices have been able to handle LTR and RTL text for decades, even within the same sentence. The issue only shows up when a strange combination of characters triggers some obscure bug in the rendering engine — which is precisely what is happening here. The sequence of two thousand characters switches the text's orientation back and forth repeatedly, and when the engine can't handle this string of characters, it locks up and crashes the app. The curious part is that Android is able to display the characters without any issue, but locks up when a user tries to tap the message.
As you may have guessed, there's nothing particularly special about WhatsApp: the bug is related to Android's text rendering engine, so almost any app that displays text is susceptible to it (Chrome seems to be immune to the bug, however). Fortunately, the bug is also mostly harmless. It won't cause any data loss, it won't force your device to reboot, and it won't prevent you from closing the app and opening it again. As far as text rendering bugs go, that's pretty tame, and the same can't be said for other bugs that have come up over the years. This isn't the first bug of its kind we've come across, and it certainly won't be the last.




It's also clear that there's nothing at all special about the black dot emoji, since it's not the emoji itself that's causing the crash. Any other emoji works just as well, though a black dot has an arguably more ominous vibe to it. 





There's a message that's making the rounds on WhatsApp that mysteriously causes the app to crash if you dare to tap on the black dot within. You may have already come across it and wondered how just tapping on a single emoji can cause an app to freeze and become unresponsive. The answer, unsurprisingly, is that it can't.

The message, which is shown below, is actually made up of more than what meets the eye. You might have even suspected as much if you already noticed that tapping anywhere on the message — and not only on the black dot — triggers the bug. The fact is that there are hundreds (around two thousand, actually) of invisible characters in the message that end up causing Android's text rendering engine to go haywire and ultimately crash, particularly on older devices. (Some newer phones like the Pixel 2 seem to recover after freezing up and don't force close the app.)





<⚫๐Ÿ‘ˆ๐Ÿป ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎from Novelvibes.com.ng you‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎ ‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏‎‏can't touch this
Since Chrome seems to behave differently when you tap text, this *probably* won't crash your browser, but copying the text into some other app likely will

The message with the invisible characters made visible. Source: Tom Scott




Tom Scott, a relatively popular YouTuber who covers multiple topics ranging from science to computers, posted a brief explanation of how the message bug works. The gist of it is that the invisible part of the message is comprised of special characters which Unicode uses to specify whether a given text should be laid out right-to-left or left-to-right. These characters are necessary to properly display text in several languages that are written right-to-left, such as Hebrew and Arabic.
There's nothing wrong with these characters per se. Modern devices have been able to handle LTR and RTL text for decades, even within the same sentence. The issue only shows up when a strange combination of characters triggers some obscure bug in the rendering engine — which is precisely what is happening here. The sequence of two thousand characters switches the text's orientation back and forth repeatedly, and when the engine can't handle this string of characters, it locks up and crashes the app. The curious part is that Android is able to display the characters without any issue, but locks up when a user tries to tap the message.
As you may have guessed, there's nothing particularly special about WhatsApp: the bug is related to Android's text rendering engine, so almost any app that displays text is susceptible to it (Chrome seems to be immune to the bug, however). Fortunately, the bug is also mostly harmless. It won't cause any data loss, it won't force your device to reboot, and it won't prevent you from closing the app and opening it again. As far as text rendering bugs go, that's pretty tame, and the same can't be said for other bugs that have come up over the years. This isn't the first bug of its kind we've come across, and it certainly won't be the last.




It's also clear that there's nothing at all special about the black dot emoji, since it's not the emoji itself that's causing the crash. Any other emoji works just as well, though a black dot has an arguably more ominous vibe to it. 

Friday, 4 May 2018

Twitter asks users to change password see reasons


It’s time to update your Twitter and GitHub passwords. Both services have confirmed that usernames and passwords were saved unmasked in plain text in internal logs. This is not a security breach, but users are advised to create a new password as a precautionary measure.

When you create an account for an online service, your login credentials should be masked using a process called hashing so that no one — not even employees at that service — can see your password. This ensures that your account is safe, even if internal systems are breached and the data makes its way into the wrong hands. But Twitter and GitHub have slipped up by inadvertently storing passwords in plain text.



Twitter Support posted a tweet suggesting that subscribers "consider changing your password on all services where you’ve used this password." Also, Twitter executives Jack Dorsey (COO) and Parag Agrawal (CTO) each sent out their own tweets about the bug. The former wrote, "We’ve fixed, see no indication of breach or misuse, and believe it’s important for us to be open about this internal defect." While Agrawal tweeted, "We are sharing this information to help people make an informed decision about their account security."

Twitter did not disclose the number of passwords that was discovered on the internal log. But as a precaution, it's asking all subscribers to have a new password. It is also advisable to change those on any other service if it's the same with the one you use on Twitter.

How to Change Your Twitter Password

Go to your Twitter account settings page.Click on accountClick password and enter your current password, then type in a new one.


It’s time to update your Twitter and GitHub passwords. Both services have confirmed that usernames and passwords were saved unmasked in plain text in internal logs. This is not a security breach, but users are advised to create a new password as a precautionary measure.

When you create an account for an online service, your login credentials should be masked using a process called hashing so that no one — not even employees at that service — can see your password. This ensures that your account is safe, even if internal systems are breached and the data makes its way into the wrong hands. But Twitter and GitHub have slipped up by inadvertently storing passwords in plain text.



Twitter Support posted a tweet suggesting that subscribers "consider changing your password on all services where you’ve used this password." Also, Twitter executives Jack Dorsey (COO) and Parag Agrawal (CTO) each sent out their own tweets about the bug. The former wrote, "We’ve fixed, see no indication of breach or misuse, and believe it’s important for us to be open about this internal defect." While Agrawal tweeted, "We are sharing this information to help people make an informed decision about their account security."

Twitter did not disclose the number of passwords that was discovered on the internal log. But as a precaution, it's asking all subscribers to have a new password. It is also advisable to change those on any other service if it's the same with the one you use on Twitter.

How to Change Your Twitter Password

Go to your Twitter account settings page.Click on accountClick password and enter your current password, then type in a new one.


It’s time to update your Twitter and GitHub passwords. Both services have confirmed that usernames and passwords were saved unmasked in plain text in internal logs. This is not a security breach, but users are advised to create a new password as a precautionary measure.


When you create an account for an online service, your login credentials should be masked using a process called hashing so that no one — not even employees at that service — can see your password. This ensures that your account is safe, even if internal systems are breached and the data makes its way into the wrong hands. But Twitter and GitHub have slipped up by inadvertently storing passwords in plain text.



Twitter Support posted a tweet suggesting that subscribers "consider changing your password on all services where you’ve used this password." Also, Twitter executives Jack Dorsey (COO) and Parag Agrawal (CTO) each sent out their own tweets about the bug. The former wrote, "We’ve fixed, see no indication of breach or misuse, and believe it’s important for us to be open about this internal defect." While Agrawal tweeted, "We are sharing this information to help people make an informed decision about their account security."

Twitter did not disclose the number of passwords that was discovered on the internal log. But as a precaution, it's asking all subscribers to have a new password. It is also advisable to change those on any other service if it's the same with the one you use on Twitter.

How to Change Your Twitter Password

Go to your Twitter account settings page.Click on accountClick password and enter your current password, then type in a new one.

Thursday, 3 May 2018

Instagram announces video chat feature,





Instagram recently announced that it would release an Instagram video chat feature.Instagram video chat will allow one-on-one conversations as well as group chats.The company didn’t give an exact date for the rollout of the new feature, but testing is going on right now.




After Instagram lifted Snapchat stories and made them better and more popular, the running joke is that anything Snapchatdoes, Instagram is likely to follow.

The trend seems to be holding up nicely, asInstagram announced today that it is testing out a new video chat feature. This announcement comes about a month after Snapchat revealed a video chat feature of its own. Not one to be outdone, WhatsAppalso announced a group video chat feature is on the way, via Android Central.

The Instagram video chat feature is in a testing phase for now, with a global rollout coming soon.


According to Instagram, users will be able to engage in both one-on-one video chats as well as “a small group” (it didn’t reveal how big that group could be). To start a video chat, you will tap a new camera icon that will appear at the top of a direct conversation thread:






Instagram says you will also be able to minimize the video chat and browse through Instagram while the chat is running. It’s not clear if you will be able to leave the app and still chat, although that seems unlikely.

In other Instagram news, the company is also making it easier for you to share content from other apps. Right now, you can share what you’re listening to onSpotify to your Instagram story with just a few taps; you don’t even need to connect your Instagram account to Spotify to make it work. You can also share GoPro videos from the GoPro app to Instagram in a similar fashion.

EDITOR'S PICK

How to delete your Instagram account

Instagram is also allowing third-parties to design Instagram filters, stickers, and text styles. It already has partnerships with major brands and celebrities like Ariana Grande, Lizy Kopshy, Vogue, and Buzzfeed. If you see a new sticker or filter, you can hit “Try it on,” and you’ll be able to test it out.

Finally, the Explore section of the Instagram app is getting a refresh with some AI power thrown in, via TechCrunch. Now, when you visit the Explore page, you’ll be presented with a list of AI-discovered topics at the top of the feed that you are probably interested in. You can then tap on one of those topics to see related content. For example, if you follow a lot of cat Instagram profiles, there might be an Animals section on the Explore page. Hitting that would take you to a feed of other animal-related accounts and hashtags.




Instagram recently announced that it would release an Instagram video chat feature.Instagram video chat will allow one-on-one conversations as well as group chats.The company didn’t give an exact date for the rollout of the new feature, but testing is going on right now.




After Instagram lifted Snapchat stories and made them better and more popular, the running joke is that anything Snapchatdoes, Instagram is likely to follow.

The trend seems to be holding up nicely, asInstagram announced today that it is testing out a new video chat feature. This announcement comes about a month after Snapchat revealed a video chat feature of its own. Not one to be outdone, WhatsAppalso announced a group video chat feature is on the way, via Android Central.

The Instagram video chat feature is in a testing phase for now, with a global rollout coming soon.


According to Instagram, users will be able to engage in both one-on-one video chats as well as “a small group” (it didn’t reveal how big that group could be). To start a video chat, you will tap a new camera icon that will appear at the top of a direct conversation thread:






Instagram says you will also be able to minimize the video chat and browse through Instagram while the chat is running. It’s not clear if you will be able to leave the app and still chat, although that seems unlikely.

In other Instagram news, the company is also making it easier for you to share content from other apps. Right now, you can share what you’re listening to onSpotify to your Instagram story with just a few taps; you don’t even need to connect your Instagram account to Spotify to make it work. You can also share GoPro videos from the GoPro app to Instagram in a similar fashion.

EDITOR'S PICK

How to delete your Instagram account

Instagram is also allowing third-parties to design Instagram filters, stickers, and text styles. It already has partnerships with major brands and celebrities like Ariana Grande, Lizy Kopshy, Vogue, and Buzzfeed. If you see a new sticker or filter, you can hit “Try it on,” and you’ll be able to test it out.

Finally, the Explore section of the Instagram app is getting a refresh with some AI power thrown in, via TechCrunch. Now, when you visit the Explore page, you’ll be presented with a list of AI-discovered topics at the top of the feed that you are probably interested in. You can then tap on one of those topics to see related content. For example, if you follow a lot of cat Instagram profiles, there might be an Animals section on the Explore page. Hitting that would take you to a feed of other animal-related accounts and hashtags.





Instagram recently announced that it would release an Instagram video chat feature.Instagram video chat will allow one-on-one conversations as well as group chats.The company didn’t give an exact date for the rollout of the new feature, but testing is going on right now.





After Instagram lifted Snapchat stories and made them better and more popular, the running joke is that anything Snapchatdoes, Instagram is likely to follow.

The trend seems to be holding up nicely, asInstagram announced today that it is testing out a new video chat feature. This announcement comes about a month after Snapchat revealed a video chat feature of its own. Not one to be outdone, WhatsAppalso announced a group video chat feature is on the way, via Android Central.

The Instagram video chat feature is in a testing phase for now, with a global rollout coming soon.


According to Instagram, users will be able to engage in both one-on-one video chats as well as “a small group” (it didn’t reveal how big that group could be). To start a video chat, you will tap a new camera icon that will appear at the top of a direct conversation thread:






Instagram says you will also be able to minimize the video chat and browse through Instagram while the chat is running. It’s not clear if you will be able to leave the app and still chat, although that seems unlikely.

In other Instagram news, the company is also making it easier for you to share content from other apps. Right now, you can share what you’re listening to onSpotify to your Instagram story with just a few taps; you don’t even need to connect your Instagram account to Spotify to make it work. You can also share GoPro videos from the GoPro app to Instagram in a similar fashion.

EDITOR'S PICK

How to delete your Instagram account

Instagram is also allowing third-parties to design Instagram filters, stickers, and text styles. It already has partnerships with major brands and celebrities like Ariana Grande, Lizy Kopshy, Vogue, and Buzzfeed. If you see a new sticker or filter, you can hit “Try it on,” and you’ll be able to test it out.

Finally, the Explore section of the Instagram app is getting a refresh with some AI power thrown in, via TechCrunch. Now, when you visit the Explore page, you’ll be presented with a list of AI-discovered topics at the top of the feed that you are probably interested in. You can then tap on one of those topics to see related content. For example, if you follow a lot of cat Instagram profiles, there might be an Animals section on the Explore page. Hitting that would take you to a feed of other animal-related accounts and hashtags.